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Stomach-churning moment AFL reporter does a shoey out of a random fan’s sneaker during a live cross

Stomach-churning moment Formula One reporter does a shoey out of a random fan’s sneaker during a live cross: ‘Definitely not Covid safe!’

  • Two reporters chug shoeys on live television during the Aussie F1 coverage 
  • It is a celebration that has been widely adopted because of  Daniel Ricciardo
  • There were no shoeys from Ricciardo, though, who missed the podium
  • He finished sixth to claim his first championship points of the season 

Australian Formula One driver Daniel Ricciardo is almost as famous for doing a shoey as he is for driving. 

Now fans are getting F1 broadcasters in on the act, with two different journalists challenged to do a shoey out of a stranger’s footwear live on air during their coverage of the Melbourne Grand Prix over the weekend.

For those new to the concept, a shoey involves taking off your shoe – or someone else’s – chugging alcohol out of it. 

Ricciardo is well-known for celebrating racing victories with a delicious shoey, an act so iconic that top Aussie winemaker St Hugo actually released a $700 boot-shaped glass inspired by the Aussie racer. 

With Formula 1 returning to Albert Park in Melbourne for the first time in two years because of the Covid pandemic, fans turned out in their droves – and some of them were thirsty.

While Fox Sports News reporter Drew Jones was doing a live cross talking about the enthusiasm of the crowd, one larrikan proved his point by popping up in front of the camera holding his shoe and a tin of alcohol.  

‘I love [Australian Formula One driver] Daniel Ricciardo,’ he said as he poured the booze into his sweaty sneaker. 

Jones stepped aside to give the man centre stage and said: ‘Well, we’ve got to let this happen,’ as the man chugged away. 

It didn’t stop there.

Jones does a shooey from a stranger's sneaker, much to the delight of the Formula 1 fan and the crowd that had assembled for the live cross

Jones does a shooey from a stranger’s sneaker, much to the delight of the Formula 1 fan and the crowd that had assembled for the live cross

The man re-loaded the shoe and offered it to Jones, who barely flinched as he took the sneaker and did a shoey of his own. 

‘Not sure, maybe that wasn’t the smartest move there, but anyway, we go with it because crowds are back for the Australian Grand Prix,’ he said.

Sports broadcaster Neroli Meadows commented: ‘Hahahahaahahha oh Lordy lord! Definitely not Covid safe (or safe under any level of hygiene standards) hahahah.’

As stomach-churning as the stunt was, it wasn’t an isolated incident.

Sky Sports pit lane reporter Ted Kravitz was doing a live cross with fans in the paddock when a fan poured a Heineken into his shoe and presented it to him. 

‘Oh no, he’s taken his shoe off, this is such a bad idea,’ he said before skolling the drink.

‘It’s quite tasty actually, not too shoey. Very nice, thank you sir.’

Ricciardo in the drivers parade before the start of the 2022 Australian Formula 1 Grand Prix in Melbourne. The Aussie is F1's most famous shoey exponent

Ricciardo in the drivers parade before the start of the 2022 Australian Formula 1 Grand Prix in Melbourne. The Aussie is F1’s most famous shoey exponent

Ricciardo finished sixth in Melbourne on Sunday behind teammate Lando Norris to move McLaren into fourth place overall in the constructors’ championship.

It was the Aussie’s first points finish of the season.

‘Satisfied enough,’ Ricciardo said of his race.

Ricciardo had his best race of the season to date in his home grand prix, finishing sixth behind his McLaren teammate Lando Norris to record his first points of the season

Ricciardo had his best race of the season to date in his home grand prix, finishing sixth behind his McLaren teammate Lando Norris to record his first points of the season

‘It’s by far our best result of the season, personally and as a team result, it was good.

‘The first part of the race I thought maybe we had a bit for Mercedes and were there with them and were holding their DRS. But then as the race progressed that was probably our pace.’ 

A total of 421,000 people attended the Australian Grand Prix, making it the largest sporting event in the nation’s history. It also broke the 400,000-crowd record set at the United States Grand Prix last year. 

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